7 easy ways to help prevent injuries this Ski Season

Snowboarding is a great activity in winter, but unfortunately there are opportunities for injuries to happen.

7 Easy ways to help prevent injuries this Ski Season

Here are a few ways to limit the risks of injury when taking part in snow sports:

Wear a Helmet

Skiing and Snowboarding are great outdoor activities for the whole family during the winter, but unfortunately there are plenty of opportunities for injuries to happen.

Here are a few ways to limit the risks of injury when taking part in snow sports:

It goes without saying, that wearing a helmet helps reduce your risk of sustaining a head injury. A lightweight, well fitting helmet is a must. As for colour, style and features, they don’t matter as much. Some feature-rich helmets do the same job as cheaper “bare-bone” models. But at the end of the day, if you like the look of your helmet and it suits your riding style, the more likely you are to use it.

Ride to your alility

The most frequent causes of injury on the slopes are loss of control and excess speed. Just because you managed to do something last season doesn’t mean you will be able to do it on your first run this season. Work up to the level you want to be at gradually and safely, or better still, practice in the off season before you go. Just don’t go and send it too hard on the first day.

Warm up before binding in

Your muscles and joints work best when they are warm and mobile. Before your first run of the day, even before putting on your boots, go through some movements to raise your heart rate, get the blood pumping to the arms and legs, and loosen up your joints. Some stretches can also be useful to loosen up areas of tightness before riding.

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Ensure your equipment is fully functional

An unnoticed broken strap or loose binding could cause you to not have complete control, and potentially harm yourself or others around you. Check everything is working correctly before going on your first run, and monitor it throughout the day. It is also very worthwhile tuning your equipment to make sure it is in a good and safe condition.

Ensure your equipment is fully functional

This includes the terrain, conditions, and also other slope users. Pay attention to mountain signage and boundaries, as hazards and unsafe areas are usually marked in some way by Ski Patrol. Try not to get distracted by the little things, such headphones falling out mid-run, getting in the way of others whilst taking a break or trying to take a photo, or getting video footage to show your friends when you’re back home.

Stay hydrated and take breaks

Dehydration and fatigue can cause you not to think or react correctly or as quickly as normal. This can be crucial in avoiding injuring yourself or other slope users.

Go prepared

Even seemingly minor aches or strains you get from day to day life can restrict your full mobility, and even be signs or symptoms of other issues in the body. These can greatly impact your riding ability and enjoyment on the slopes. This is where treatments such as Sports Massage and Osteopathy are especially able to help.